Halloween in December

 
Ghost stories are a beloved tradition at Christmas. At least they used to be, that kind of stopped being a thing around the year 1890. But me, I’m always down for a good scary story. If you’re more interested in something spooky (also psychedelic, haunting and a little sleazy) than something festive (bah humbug!) check out this round up of my personal favorite 70s horror movies that I wrote for The Peachiest here.

I’m looking forward to launching a movie column for them soon, where I will explore the historical contexts of movies about or from the 1970’s. Hit me up in the comments with a name for the column, because I am completely stuck.

Last thing: If you’re so inclined, I have updated my resume with a much fancier layout and expanded my ‘professional services’ section. Feel free to check it out and contact me for any writing needs you may have, or just to say hi. 

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LGBTA Culture Celebrated At Zine Fest

I’m so happy that I got to write about Philly Zine Fest for the Philadelphia Gay News. PZF has been the highlight of my summer (or depending on the Rotunda’s schedule) for the last ten years and it’s such a thrill to share what I love about this day with readers. It was also a treat to interview so many writers I love, including Elvis, who puts so much humor and life in queer herstory though their zine, Homos in Herstory and local author Kate Haegele whose novel White Elephants you should endeavor to purchase asap.

“When I came to Zine Fest for the first time, in 2003, afterwards I felt like, ‘Why can’t the whole world be like Zine Fest?’” said long-time exhibitor Kate Haegele of the linguistics zine “The La-La Theory” and her memoir “White Elephants.”

“The zine community isn’t passive, they’re doers. Everyone is so supportive because they know doing this isn’t easy,” she added. “Finding zine people meant finding my people.”

Read the rest here, at epgn.com.

I conducted this interview with Ms. Millett last year. It stands out as one of my favorite interviews I’ve done yet. In the 3+ hour conversation, Caroline’s stories of chic, glamorous international intrigue captured my imagination. Ms. Millett can be found on LinkedIn and Facebook

I had the pleasure of interviewing Philadelphia designer Caroline Dunlop-Millett this week. Born in Kansas City and raised near Chicago, she’s been a U.S. diplomat, studied design under Louis Kahn, and helped transform West Philadelphia into University City. She is currently the head of Millett Design and has written two books.

BB: So you grew up near Chicago. Tell me how you ended up in Brazil as a U.S. Diplomat in the 60’s.

CDM: Well, I really wanted to go to law school. I was going to be a trial lawyer who defended the poor and downtrodden. I really believed that! But that isn’t what lawyers do, I know that now. So went to Stanford, where there were only four women in my class. Within two weeks, I knew it wasn’t the place for me, and I was very unhappy. I no longer had a life path. Some women, their path is to get married and have babies, but I certainly wasn’t giving over to that.  Continue reading